UPCOMING NEW RELEASE! FRONT PAGE OTTAWA: Front Page Ottawa: Stories from the Ottawa Citizen 1845 to Present by Bruce Deachman GET 2 FOR $38 (DISCOUNT AUTOMATIC AT CHECKOUT)
UPCOMING NEW RELEASE! FRONT PAGE OTTAWA: Front Page Ottawa: Stories from the Ottawa Citizen 1845 to Present by Bruce Deachman GET 2 FOR $38 (DISCOUNT AUTOMATIC AT CHECKOUT)
Ottawa Press and Publishing

UPCOMING NEW RELEASE! FRONT PAGE OTTAWA: Front Page Ottawa: Stories from the Ottawa Citizen 1845 to Present by Bruce Deachman GET 2 FOR $38 (DISCOUNT AUTOMATIC AT CHECKOUT)

Regular price $24.95 Sale price $29.95 Unit price per

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From the archives of the Ottawa Citizen, and the pen of senior writer Bruce Deachman, comes Front Page Ottawa, the latest release from Ottawa Press and Publishing.

Front Page Ottawa is a collection of Citizen stories going back to 1845, the year the newspaper published its first edition. (It was called The Packet back then.)

The Citizen was there to cover the Great Farini and Elvis Presley, the Great Hull Fire, and the collapse of the Heron Road Bridge. Important stories, routine stories, bizarre stories — the Ottawa Citizen has covered them all.

In the process, it has told the story of the nation’s capital. Starting twelve years after John By left town.

All the stories in Front Page Ottawa were written and curated by Bruce Deachman. Many of them first appeared as part of Bruce’s That was Then series, which ran as part of the Citizen’s 175th-anniversary coverage.

Read the Citizen’s breathless page-one stories on the “Grand Slam” of Bridge in 1931-32. The newspaper’s thorough coverage of the Ottawa Senators’ 1923 Stanley Cup win. And get ready — step right up, ladies and gentlemen — for the Great Farini and one of the greatest high-wire stunts of the Victorian era.

Filled with archival photos and original newspaper covers (VE Day, Titanic, 1929 Stock Market Collapse, etc.) Front Page Ottawa is a newspaper-history-buff’s dream book.